Stress and Migraines

By Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW

Yesterday I was outside quite a bit and ended up with a massive migraine. We then went for food. The restaurant was quite packed, and I do not like being surrounded by that many people. It worsened my headache. Suddenly, the food began to strongly repulse me. I fled, and didn’t think much of it. I awoke this morning, still with the headache, and still unable to eat. I am hungry, but unable to stomach anything. What could that mean?

A. It could be that you are still experiencing the effects of a migraine headache but only your physician could determine that. Some individuals report having migraine headaches that can last for several days. Some of the symptoms of migraines include nausea, vomiting, physical sensations or tingling in the legs or arms, and sensitivity to light or sounds. Symptoms can vary from individual to individual.

It is important that you report these symptoms to your parents. Are you in treatment for your migraine headaches? If not, then you should be. There are medications that can be prescribed to treat migraine headaches. Usually over-the-counter headache medication is not enough to effectively treat a migraine. I am not certain if you have already been prescribed a migraine medication or if the medicine you are currently taking is not effective. This is why it is important to speak to your parents and/or treating professionals about this problem as soon as possible. Thanks for your question. Please take care.

Photo

 

 

Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 30 Jun 2010

APA Reference
Randle, K. (2010). Stress and Migraines. Psych Central. Retrieved on November 22, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2010/06/30/stress-and-migraines/