Too Many Problems

By Kristina Randle, Ph.D., LCSW

Q. I’ve been struggling for depression for a long time, exactly how long I’m not sure, but I know thoughts of suicide have been present since I was 14. I’ve waited this long to reach out for help, but when I tried to tell my mom, even telling her about my suicide thoughts, she didn’t do anything, even though I asked for an appointment with the doctor. That was about a year ago when I told her and I’m just now trying again to find help elsewhere, because the suicidal thoughts are becoming really casual, like having a conversation with a friend, I’ll tell myself one morning “maybe I could overdose on Aspirin…” or something. I don’t want it to be this way anymore but I don’t know what to do. I have no friends at school, I’m very asocial and practically live locked away in my room when I’m not at school, I’ve stopped trusting people and I have this unexplainable fear of sex. I’ve never had a relationship with anyone, and really don’t wish to get into one ever, I guess I’m sort of afraid of that too. At 17, I know that isn’t normal. I don’t know what to do though if my parents won’t help. Thanks for your time.

A. You can’t rely on your mother for help. It’s up to you at this point in time to take responsibility. You should tell her how unhappy you feel and the fact that you do have suicidal thoughts. If she does not agree to make arrangements for you, bring this up to the counselor at school, and make him or her aware of your suicidal thoughts. This may make you mother more motivated to take you seriously. If these thoughts become strong you should take yourself to the hospital and tell them that you are feeling suicidal and insist that they take you into the hospital and admit you.

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Last reviewed: By John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on 24 May 2005

APA Reference
Randle, K. (2005). Too Many Problems. Psych Central. Retrieved on December 21, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/ask-the-therapist/2005/05/24/too-many-problems/